Highlights of my work in the area of Statistics

The motto at my college is: Discover. Connect. Advance. I believe this perfectly describes my path to becoming a statistician. I discovered statistics when I took a Mathematical Statistics course as an undergraduate student. I connected with the topic through the experiences I had as a graduate student. I have advanced through professional networking and by staying on top of current issues in the field.

I never thought that I would be a Statistician. However, when I took my first Mathematical Statistics course as an undergraduate student, I realized I finally understood calculus for the first time in my life. That moment is what lead me to get my Masters in Statistics from Oakland University.

While at Oakland University, I gained valuable experience through an assistantship in the Office of Research Support and Statistical Design and worked as a Supplemental Instruction Leader for an Introductory Statistics course. I also received multiple certificates of Merit for Outstanding Academic Achievement in Statistics, as well as the 2007 American Society for Quality Dr. W. Edwards Deming Scholarship.

I have been a member of the American Statistical Association (ASA) for many years, and gave a presentation of my Masters Project, “The Effect of Weibull Populations on X-bar and R Charts,” to the Detroit Chapter of the ASA.

As a Statistics Educator, I have tried multiple initiatives in my classroom to improve statistics education, including receiving numerous Innovation Awards at my college. The first, MOTT – Math On Target Tutoring, was to pilot in-class tutors and supplemental instruction. The second, Macomb V.O.W.E.L. – Vocabulary Overall: increasing understanding of Words in the English Language, was to study the correlation between vocabulary and statistical comprehension.

Each semester I have my statistics students create statistics-based cultural displays that are viewed by thousands of community members at the county library. I have also been on the Statistics Final Exam and Course Assessment Committee at my college.

I have given a presentation on “Active Learning in the Statistics Classroom” at the AMATYC, MichMATYC, and MiCTM conferences, as well as many presentations at other conferences. Also, I have facilitated an AMATYC Statistics Traveling Workshop at St. Louis Community College-Meramec.

In addition, I try to stay an active member of the AMATYC Statistics Committee. I have also been a reviewer for the OpenStax Statistics text and was on the Sapling Learning Statistics Advisory Board.

I would not be the Statistician or Statistics Educator that I am today without the opportunities I have been given over the years to learn, grow, and develop. I am committed to making everyone’s path to learning statistics as open as mine was.