I’m in a Facebook Group in which there was a recent discussion about what to do about a student who has type 1 diabetes, autism, a learning disability, an emotional disability, and very poor eyesight. The student can do the required coursework but is often disruptive in class. The instructor is doing everything to the best of her ability to accommodate the student but asked for suggestions as to what else she might be able to do.

I found some references that I thought might be helpful, and thought it could be beneficial to others to share the resources here as well:

Academic Supports for College Students with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Overview

https://www.iidc.indiana.edu/styles/iidc/defiles/IRCA/AcademicSupportsOct2018acc.pdf

https://www.iidc.indiana.edu/pages/academic-supports-for-college-students-with-an-autism-spectrum-disorder

Teaching College Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-classroom-management/teaching-college-students-with-autism-spectrum-disorders/

Students with Autism in the College Classroom

https://www.heath.gwu.edu/students-autism-college-classroom

Students on the autism spectrum are often as smart as their peers — so why do so few go to college?

https://hechingerreport.org/students-autism-spectrum-often-smart-peers-go-college/

How to Teach an Autistic College Student

https://www.wikihow.com/Teach-an-Autistic-College-Student

As someone who worked as a counselor at a special needs summer camp during college, I’ve always had a very soft spot in my heart for students with special needs. They are just as able to do the work in your classes as any other student if you have patience with them and give them the proper support.

Yes, you do have to be conscientious of whether you are setting the student up for success by giving them specific support. But also remember that what is considered success is different for each student. Some students come to our classes, and we know that they will be a future engineer. Other students come to our classes, and we know that success for them might be to pass their first-ever college course. Whenever you encounter a problematic situation in your classroom, I encourage you to take a step back and view the situation through the eyes of your students.