Student Success in Accelerated Classes

I’m in a Facebook Group in which there was a question about student success in courses with compressed or accelerated schedules. At my college we offer all of our online courses in the 8-week format and we also offer some of our on-campus classes in a 12-week ‘late start’ format. However, I believe the length of the class is not the only factor that affects student success in a course. Course Size Our online classes have a cap of 22 students and on-campus classes have a cap of 35 students. Academic Dishonesty Due to the increased opportunity for academic dishonesty in online classes, we require a 60% or higher on a proctored on-campus final exam to pass an 8-week online class. No Show Students A student is marked as a ‘No Show’ student after 3-weeks, whether it is a 8-week, 12-week, or 16-week class. However, three weeks in an eight week class is significantly different than three weeks in a 16-week class. Even if the success rate...
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Distribution of my Facebook Friends’ Names

The other day I was talking with my friend Matt, and he said to me that he thought I knew a lot of people with names starting with “J.” I thought that was a bit strange, but then he claimed that he felt that most of my friend’s names began with a “J.” So, I started looking through my Facebook Friends list out of curiosity, and sure enough, Matt was right. The distribution of my Facebook Friends’ Names is below: As you can see, the highest is “J” with 43, followed by “S – 35,” “M – 32,” “D – 31,” and “R – 30.” And if your name starts with a “U” or an “X,” I’m likely not to be your friend. So, I wanted to test Matt’s hypothesis that most of my friend’s names start with a “J.” H0: the proportion of my friend’s names that start with a “J” is 0.5 H1: the proportion of my friend’s names that start with...
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The New Push for Online Courses

At my college, there has been a push to add additional sections of many online courses due to increasing demand. There are many reasons for this new push for online classes, including  recent changes in our placement test scores. Now more students are placing into Beginning Algebra than into Intermediate Algebra. Although generally in a time in which college enrollments are typically declining, the additional classes would be welcome, this new push for online courses has raised many concerns: How should online courses be assigned to faculty? Before every semester, faculty select their classes. Sometimes it is not possible to please every faculty member. Suppose a faculty member desired to teach three online courses but was only assigned to teach two online classes. Should that faculty member automatically be offered any additional online sections added to the schedule after selections have occurred? Should this trump seniority in this case? Should the instructor be allowed to change their schedule to accommodate another online...
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Academic Supports for College Students with An Autism Spectrum Disorder

I’m in a Facebook Group in which there was a recent discussion about what to do about a student who has type 1 diabetes, autism, a learning disability, an emotional disability, and very poor eyesight. The student can do the required coursework but is often disruptive in class. The instructor is doing everything to the best of her ability to accommodate the student but asked for suggestions as to what else she might be able to do. I found some references that I thought might be helpful, and thought it could be beneficial to others to share the resources here as well: Academic Supports for College Students with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Overview https://www.iidc.indiana.edu/styles/iidc/defiles/IRCA/AcademicSupportsOct2018acc.pdf https://www.iidc.indiana.edu/pages/academic-supports-for-college-students-with-an-autism-spectrum-disorder Teaching College Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-classroom-management/teaching-college-students-with-autism-spectrum-disorders/ Students with Autism in the College Classroom https://www.heath.gwu.edu/students-autism-college-classroom Students on the autism spectrum are often as smart as their peers — so why do so few go to college? https://hechingerreport.org/students-autism-spectrum-often-smart-peers-go-college/ How to Teach an Autistic College Student https://www.wikihow.com/Teach-an-Autistic-College-Student As someone who worked as a counselor at a special needs...
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LGBT History Month: A Salute to Dan Choi

I recently found out that it is LGBT history month, which got me thinking about what this means to me as a Korean and as an adoptee. This year was the 20th year of Seoul’s gay pride march. And although I was not in attendance, I was in Korea during the 2nd annual Incheon Queer Culture Festival. Last year’s festival in Incheon did not go off without incident, and so it feels good to know that there is progress being made toward tolerance, even if it is slowly. The News Lens documented some of the progress in their February 2018 article. For those of you who don’t know, I am now the Website Coordinator for the Korean American Adoptee Adoptive Family Network (KAAN). KAAN recently launched a blog and is working on content for its social media channels. I suggested that a post about LGBT history month could be of relevance to KAAN Members. But that’s all I had. My first thought...
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My Experience Learning Korean

This summer, I was a student in the Short-Term Korean Language Program at Ewha University. Although I learned a lot, the pace of having classes and field trips from about 9 am to 5 pm every day, combined with needing to do at least 10 hours of studying a night, was too much for me. The program was terrific, and I was able to read, write, and speak some Korean by the end of the class. However, I just was not ready to take the 5-hour final exam at the end. I don't consider this a failure, as I accomplished what I set out to do - learn more Korean than what I knew when I started. However, upon reflection, the one thing that would have been the most helpful for me while taking this class would have been to have flashcards made before the program began. I spent a large amount of my study time each evening, making flashcards instead of taking...
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Do you want me to translate that for you?

On Tuesday, October 22, 2019, at about 5 p.m., I was at Peepo's Subs & Shawarma at 10890 Beech Daly Rd, Taylor, MI 48180. I asked for chicken shawarma and rice. The employee told me that the only way that I could order that is if I ordered 'Peepo's Plate, a.k.a Peepo's Bowl, which their menu describes as 'Turmeric Rice topped with your choice of Africano Meat, Tomatoes, Lettuce & drizzled with our Homemade Ranch.' So, I ordered the 'Peepo's Plate' and asked for it with chicken shawarma instead of Africano Meat, tomatoes, no ranch, and add pickles and Fattoush dressing. When the meal came to the table, it had grilled onions, mushrooms, peppers, & cheese on the bowl. My friend Matt took the food up to the counter and explained that I could not eat it because I am allergic to the unexpected ingredients. The employee told him that the grilled onions, mushrooms, peppers, & cheese came with the bowl,...
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The Benefits of Online Office Hours

I recently read a post in a Facebook Group by a math instructor who described her office hours as "throwing an hour of my life away every week." This comment upset me much. I have an average of one student show up for my online office hours each semester. However, I never feel that holding office hours is a waste of my time. I feel that holding online office hours has helped to increase overall student satisfaction in my courses. From the student perspective, I believe there is something psychological about knowing an instructor is available to help, even if the student doesn't ask for help. And from my perspective, hosting the online office hours is not an inconvenience to me at all. At my college, we use Zoom, which has a web version and a mobile app. I tend to open the Zoom session on my phone so that I can hear the chime if a student enters the meeting. Then...
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Student Engagement In and Out of the Classroom

On November 7, 2014, I attended the ETOM Conference at St. Clair Community College in Port Huron, MI. One of the underlying themes of this year conference was student engagement in and out of the classroom. As an instructor who hasn’t taken classes in quite some time, sometimes I forget how difficult it is to be a student in the 21st century. Between the rising cost of college, the changing nature of technology, and the demands at home, it is often a struggle to engage students in the classroom. This conference helped give me a different perspective of how I can look at my classes in a new way. The opening session focused on Open Educational Resources and how the cost of textbooks has an impact on which classes students take and how engaged the students are with the college. The statistics are clear that higher textbook costs lead students to take fewer classes and sometimes not to take any classes...
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