Student Success in Accelerated Classes

I’m in a Facebook Group in which there was a question about student success in courses with compressed or accelerated schedules. At my college we offer all of our online courses in the 8-week format and we also offer some of our on-campus classes in a 12-week ‘late start’ format. However, I believe the length of the class is not the only factor that affects student success in a course. Course Size Our online classes have a cap of 22 students and on-campus classes have a cap of 35 students. Academic Dishonesty Due to the increased opportunity for academic dishonesty in online classes, we require a 60% or higher on a proctored on-campus final exam to pass an 8-week online class. No Show Students A student is marked as a ‘No Show’ student after 3-weeks, whether it is a 8-week, 12-week, or 16-week class. However, three weeks in an eight week class is significantly different than three weeks in a 16-week class. Even if the success rate...
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The New Push for Online Courses

At my college, there has been a push to add additional sections of many online courses due to increasing demand. There are many reasons for this new push for online classes, including  recent changes in our placement test scores. Now more students are placing into Beginning Algebra than into Intermediate Algebra. Although generally in a time in which college enrollments are typically declining, the additional classes would be welcome, this new push for online courses has raised many concerns: How should online courses be assigned to faculty? Before every semester, faculty select their classes. Sometimes it is not possible to please every faculty member. Suppose a faculty member desired to teach three online courses but was only assigned to teach two online classes. Should that faculty member automatically be offered any additional online sections added to the schedule after selections have occurred? Should this trump seniority in this case? Should the instructor be allowed to change their schedule to accommodate another online...
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Academic Supports for College Students with An Autism Spectrum Disorder

I’m in a Facebook Group in which there was a recent discussion about what to do about a student who has type 1 diabetes, autism, a learning disability, an emotional disability, and very poor eyesight. The student can do the required coursework but is often disruptive in class. The instructor is doing everything to the best of her ability to accommodate the student but asked for suggestions as to what else she might be able to do. I found some references that I thought might be helpful, and thought it could be beneficial to others to share the resources here as well: Academic Supports for College Students with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Overview https://www.iidc.indiana.edu/styles/iidc/defiles/IRCA/AcademicSupportsOct2018acc.pdf https://www.iidc.indiana.edu/pages/academic-supports-for-college-students-with-an-autism-spectrum-disorder Teaching College Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-classroom-management/teaching-college-students-with-autism-spectrum-disorders/ Students with Autism in the College Classroom https://www.heath.gwu.edu/students-autism-college-classroom Students on the autism spectrum are often as smart as their peers — so why do so few go to college? https://hechingerreport.org/students-autism-spectrum-often-smart-peers-go-college/ How to Teach an Autistic College Student https://www.wikihow.com/Teach-an-Autistic-College-Student As someone who worked as a counselor at a special needs...
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