Tag Archives: Jing

Videos on Multiplying Fractions

A couple of students in my on-line classes have been asking questions about multiplying fractions.  Should you simplify before or after multiplying?  How should you simplify?  By cross-canceling directly, or by a prime factorization and cross-canceling combo?  Here are some videos I have made to help clarify the situation.



View on screencast.com »

Factoring the Difference of Two Perfect Squares

These videos are on Section 6.5.  Please watch the videos over the weekend and come prepared with the completed handout on Monday.  We will have further discussion in class.



View on screencast.com »

Factoring_Demos.pdf
Download this file

Percent Increase and Decrease

Here’s a sample lesson on Percent Increase and Decrease designed for a 52-minute Pre-Algebra class.

1.  Start by watching the video on ‘Percent Increase’.  Make sure that students have the handout so that they don’t have to write down the application problem.
2.  Have students work on the two ‘Group Work’ problems on percent increase.
3.  Follow the same process for ‘Percent Decrease’.
4.  Have the students do the Percent Increase and Decrease ‘Matching Activity’.  You need to have the tiles cut apart for them already.  If there is not enough time to complete this in class (There usually isn’t), suggest that the students take the activity home.  If you wish, have the students bring the completed matches back to the next class for credit.

 

 

This Calculus Game Needs a Sweet Name… Any Suggestions?

I just finished this new Calculus game in anticipation of teaching a lesson on The First Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.  I’m looking to give it a good name.  Any suggestions?

Calculus Game.pdf
Download this file

Jing Video and notes to accompany my lesson:



View on screencast.com »

Intergal_Video.pdf
Download this file

Jing Video and notes for the Second Fundamental Theorem of Calculus:



View on screencast.com »

The_Second_Fundamental_Theorem_of_Calculus.pdf
Download this file

Group_Work_Problems.pdf
Download this file

Solving a System of Equations with Two Unknowns

A Sample Lesson on Solving a System of Equations with Two Unknowns
Before you begin, you may want to print the summary sheet below for reference.  The sheet happens to have a major typo, but I think that it’s usually fun for the students to discover it themselves. I’ve been generous enough to correct the typo.
Start out by watching this introductory video about solving an application problem using the addition method.  I recommend printing out the handout of what is covered in the video so that you can take notes as you follow along.

Go to Wolfram|Alpha and make sure that you know how to enter systems of equations there so that you can check your answer using this wonderful tool whenever you are at a computer.  Or even on the go, if you have a smartphone.

This is a link to the solution for the problem shown in the video:  http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=solve+the+system+.34x+%2B+1.98y+%3D+3990%2C++.73x+%2B+2.45y+%3D+5865

Next, watch this short video on solving systems of equations using the substitution method.

 

If you have time, which I hope you do, please print out the page below, cut apart, and match the each system of equations with its correct solution.
Finally, here is a link to a wonderful on-line Jeopardy-style game for one or two players, that covers how to solve Systems of Two Equations (and Inequalities) with two unknowns.

http://www.quia.com/cb/79607.html

10 Potentially Helpful Resources

Here is the most recent set of helpful resources that I have sort of stumbled upon out of well over 200 hundred that I’ve looked at today:

1.  Broad Texter – This is a service that allows you to create a group so that your students can join so that they can receive text messages from you.  In fact, I’ve set up one for my students that I hope to use in the near future.  Feel free to sign up at the top of the page if you’re so inclined.

2.  Smart Teaching Blog – My biggest advice when looking at this blog is to start scrolling down and to not get overwhelmed, as there are probably 1000s of resources listed, including this list of the 100 Best YouTube Videos for Teachers.

3.  Get the Math – This the link to ‘Get the Math, an initiative out of the PBS Station in NYC, which has challenges related to fields such as Fashion and Video Games.  I know I posted this on twitter earlier, but that’s why you need to follow along (if you’re not already).

 

4.  Bubbl.us – This is a simple and free web application that lets you brainstorm online (essentially a stripped down version of Mindomo), so it would be ideal for those who are beginning into the world of Mind-Mapping.


5.  CamStudio – Free streaming video software.  I mean, does the name remind you of something?  Personally, I’m doing just fine with Jing! for now, but some people may want to check into this.


6.  Poll Everywhere – Allows you to create a poll that your audience can participate in using their cell phones, twitter, or the web.  I’ve personally used this in a classroom before as a quick and simple alternative to using clickers.  It doesn’t give you a person-by-person tally, but you can get an overall idea of if your students understand a concept.


7.  Super Saas – An online scheduler, which I want to try out for future semesters to have students self-schedule for my office hours.  I think that they may be more likely to come if they can schedule themselves.  Has anyone tried this successfully?  I would love to hear!


8.  ToonDoo – The online cartoon, comic strip creator.  Create your own cartoons, comic strips, publish, share, and discuss!  In fact, I’ve mentioned something similar, called ‘Make Belief Comix’ in the past.  The major difference upfront is that ToonDoo is in color.


9.  Transfer Big Files – Transfer files up to 1 GB.  This would have been especially helpful when I was having trouble with students sending me their homework assignments last semester.  Another similar website is You Send It.  


10.  Motivational Posters – This actually could be turned into a great class project if the students created a mathematics-related image themselves, along with a descriptor to put along the bottom.  Another similar website is The Parody Motivational Generator.

Using Jing in the On-line Classroom

I just started facilitating my first on-line course ever this week.  I say facilitate, because I really don't believe that I'm actually teaching the students anything in the traditional sense.  In fact, they are actually learning through reading the textbook, discussion forums on ANGEL, and MathZone.  However, since this is my first experience with MathZone, I don't actually have very many tips to give the students, as I am learning the quirks of the platform along with them.  One of them is the way that the student must enter the multiplication symbol.  I think that this tutorial that I made using Jing may actually be useful to others.  But that's not why I'm sharing this.  I'm sharing it because I want to make everyone aware of Jing, a free program for making instant screenshots and screencasts that I have found to be an invaluable resource in getting material from my computer to my students.  And now that I am facilitating an on-line course, Jing has just become about 10 times more useful overnight.  Check it out:



View on screencast.com »