Tag Archives: Mindmapping

Mind Maps for Calculus, Algebra, and Statistics

This semester I decided that I wanted to organize all of the resources that I’ve found on the Internet onto Mind Maps for my Calculus, Algebra, and Statistics classes.  There was just too much that I wanted to tell my students about every semester that it started to become too overwhelming to repost the links on my LMS every semester (my courses don’t ever seem to copy very well from semester to semester).  The results are below.  Feel free to share with everyone.

For the calculus map, bit.ly/calcmap

For the algebra map, bit.ly/algebramap

For the statistics map, bit.ly/statmap

 

 

Links to Student Created MindMaps

These are some MindMaps that were created by some of my former students in a Pre-Algebra course.

Football Coaching VS. Math – Juan's MindMap
Algebra – Betty's MindMap
Addition – Porche's MindMap
Math OverView – Shaniqua's MindMap
Whole Numbers – Holly's MindMap
Basic Math Help – Matt's MindMap
Integers – Rico's MindMap
Positive & Negative Numbers – Jamal's MindMap
Algebra – Jaron's MindMap
Income – Aaron's MindMap

MindMap for Basic Mathematics Project

I learned a lot from the class that I took on Online Learning and Teaching this semester.  We used the book Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe.  This course has revolutionized the entire way that I think about teaching and learning.  As of late, when planning lessons, I keep finding myself needing to list the big idea, the misconceptions, and the essential questions.  I’ve also found this to be a good way to organize my own learning.  This book is truly a great read.
As part of this course, we had to design a demo course using the ideas in the book.  To present my course, I decided to use a mindmap, rather than a PowerPoint presentation.  I thought I would post it here as just a little sample of everything that I have been working so hard to do this semester.

http://www.mindomo.com/view?m=ed9c47bcafeb408495c2e52561fae659

A Paper Idea for Learning to Plot Points

First of all, congratulations to Maria Andersen for winning the Mindomo MindMap of the Week.  Now, let’s document my journey over the next 30 minutes or so after I started hunting around the Play and Learn Mind Map.  And this is truly interesting, as it might show you exactly how I think sometimes.

I started with the Play and Learn Mind Map, which led me to the Playing to Learn Math Mind Map (Also by Maria Andersen).
I noticed that the Playing to Learn Math Mind Map (a work in progress) did not have any links to games about logarithms (although there is a spot for it).

I started searching Google for Logarithm Games and I came across this post called This Game Really is Worth 1000 Worksheets, which is simply a printable war-style card game about logarithms.

This site then led me to Let’s Play Math, where I found a wonderful post about a Graph-It Game.  However, the Graph-It Game only came with one -9985″>Christmas Example.  

So, I started searching Google again for “Plotting Points to Make a Picture Worksheet”.  Kaboom!  A lot of examples came up, all of which I think could be useful in their own way:  Mystery Graph (Owl) or click here for even more mystery graphs.

I also found these not so free options, although I am mildly inclined to sign-up for the ‘free trials’ and see what I can pull out of there in my 10 days with them.

1.  Math Crush has even more mystery graphs, and even a Battleship activity.
2.  Lesson Planet has some more as well.
3.  Math Worksheet Center has a ton of data and graphing worksheets.

Along the way, I also stumbled upon this post of the 20 Best Math Games and Puzzles.

Overall, I think it was a productive 30 minutes or so, and I hope that you found this post useful.  I am starting graphing with my Beginning Algebra students at the end of this week, so I will let you know how incorporating this whole Graph-It/Mystery Picture Idea works out.  Although, this is not something totally different than the What’s Brewing Worksheet that I have been borrowing from Pete Falzone’s website for a couple of years now.  But having more than one ‘picture’ is a good thing, since I am personally getting bored of seeing students draw the same coffee cup semester after semester after semester!

Twitter Link Round-Up

Here’s a recap of the links that I’ve posted on Twitter over the past week or so:

1.  A friend told me that she used this Divisibility Rocks game from over at The Utah Education Network with her Developmental Math students and that it worked really well.  It turns out that they have plenty of other great lesson plans as well.

2.  Z-Type is a very intense typing game.  It turns out that as a Math Instructor, I do have to teach typing, computer, and writing skills as well.  For example:  One student told me just today that he couldn’t write a paper for my class about an African American Mathematician because he hadn’t had an English class yet.

3.  NightMare is an example of a 25-word story.  I’m considering having my students write their own 25 word stories about a concept in mathematics.  This would be good introductory video to show to students, though, because it is absolutely hilarious!  It’s one of the best laughs that I have had in a really, really long time.

4.  100 Ideas for Data Projector and Document Camera – Well, yeah, these ideas really are for my friends who still want to teach like they’re still in the 19th century.  And even if you’re already using the document camera, I’m sure that you can’t think of 100 ideas.  Well, maybe you can.

5.  Times Attack is an awesome multiplication game that takes over the top spot for me as my favorite multiplication game ever!  And let me tell you, I learned so much from the hour I played this game just about the world of video games.  I was just as frustrated with figuring out how to navigate as I am sure a student would be with doing the multiplication.

6.  Math Illustrations is a new program that I just found out about for drawing mathematical figures that I really think that you will like once you watch the tutorial video on this page.  It is so great that I am really considering the $59 fee to buy this program because I think it would make my life a lot easier in the long run.  And the Word Drawing tools suck, especially for number lines.

7.  NCTM Black History Month Resources – It’s Black History Month and I am trying to incorporate some lessons into my curriculum.  I found these resources to be extremely helpful.  I am even going to check the recommended book out from my library to read over the next month or so.  I checked already and it is indeed one of the books that they have!

8.  E-Learning Tools for Schools and Education is a Mindomo Mind Map with hundreds of wonderful resources for E-learning.  There are a lot of tools that I thought were regrettably left off the list as well.  However, I know that there are plenty of resources on the list that I have yet to explore.  I hope that you have time to explore some of them as well and to find what will work best for you.

9.  Math Wordles – I have talked about Wordles on this site plenty of times in the past and this activity just reminded me of the fact that there are so many things that can be done with a Wordle.  My plan is to develop a modified version of this activity in the near future to use with one of my classes.  As described, I think this could be a great activity for Math Anxiety toward the beginning of a semester.

10.  On-line LaTeX Equation Editor – I think LaTeX is so easy for entering equations, and I especially love how in the newer versions of Word I can type LaTeX code directly into Equation Editor.  However, even that bridge until the next time I can use LaTeX is not enough.  I can see this on-line tool being a great use to some people.

11.  TED Talks I’ve ‘liked’ over the past week:

10 Potentially Helpful Resources

Here is the most recent set of helpful resources that I have sort of stumbled upon out of well over 200 hundred that I’ve looked at today:

1.  Broad Texter – This is a service that allows you to create a group so that your students can join so that they can receive text messages from you.  In fact, I’ve set up one for my students that I hope to use in the near future.  Feel free to sign up at the top of the page if you’re so inclined.

2.  Smart Teaching Blog – My biggest advice when looking at this blog is to start scrolling down and to not get overwhelmed, as there are probably 1000s of resources listed, including this list of the 100 Best YouTube Videos for Teachers.

3.  Get the Math – This the link to ‘Get the Math, an initiative out of the PBS Station in NYC, which has challenges related to fields such as Fashion and Video Games.  I know I posted this on twitter earlier, but that’s why you need to follow along (if you’re not already).

 

4.  Bubbl.us – This is a simple and free web application that lets you brainstorm online (essentially a stripped down version of Mindomo), so it would be ideal for those who are beginning into the world of Mind-Mapping.


5.  CamStudio – Free streaming video software.  I mean, does the name remind you of something?  Personally, I’m doing just fine with Jing! for now, but some people may want to check into this.


6.  Poll Everywhere – Allows you to create a poll that your audience can participate in using their cell phones, twitter, or the web.  I’ve personally used this in a classroom before as a quick and simple alternative to using clickers.  It doesn’t give you a person-by-person tally, but you can get an overall idea of if your students understand a concept.


7.  Super Saas – An online scheduler, which I want to try out for future semesters to have students self-schedule for my office hours.  I think that they may be more likely to come if they can schedule themselves.  Has anyone tried this successfully?  I would love to hear!


8.  ToonDoo – The online cartoon, comic strip creator.  Create your own cartoons, comic strips, publish, share, and discuss!  In fact, I’ve mentioned something similar, called ‘Make Belief Comix’ in the past.  The major difference upfront is that ToonDoo is in color.


9.  Transfer Big Files – Transfer files up to 1 GB.  This would have been especially helpful when I was having trouble with students sending me their homework assignments last semester.  Another similar website is You Send It.  


10.  Motivational Posters – This actually could be turned into a great class project if the students created a mathematics-related image themselves, along with a descriptor to put along the bottom.  Another similar website is The Parody Motivational Generator.

Mindmaps

This semester I'm taking a class on Online Teaching and Learning (IST 670) at Oakland University.  It's a new class, so the instructor is developing the syllabus around our interests.  Wednesday was our first class.  During the discussion we talked about creating a database in MOODLE so that students could organize their thoughts and then search for them later.  But to me, I've never really warmed up to the idea of a database.  I mean, it's nice to have something that's searchable and student created.  But the whole time I was sitting there listening, I was constantly reminded about a this post over at Teaching College Math about Mindmaps for Learning.  I actually thought about it so much, that the next morning I gave my developmental math classes an assignment of creating their own mindmap on any topic in mathematics using Mindomo.  I know that this is a broad assignment, and maybe I should have limited the topics a little bit more, but since it's the first week of class, I also wanted to use it as an assignment to get to know my students and their level of creativity.
If you're not familiar with mindmaps, or mindomo, again, please check out the the post on Mindmaps for Learning.  In addition, on the Mindomo website, I found a couple of great mindmaps on Math News and the Top 20 Algebra Websites.  There is also a link on TechUp to the screencast which I have linked to below: