New Probability Assignment

Last week I posted this on twitter after I attended the Math In Action Conference at Grand Valley State University: However, I couldn't post the assignment online right away as I hadn't given it out to my students at that point.  Now I can.  Although I had lots of student questions about the assignment (more than I do a 'normal' assignment), I could tell that this problem had the students think outside of the box more than they would have had I not given them this assignment at all. I tried to manage the student questions by starting a discussion thread on CANVAS and I jumped in at what I thought were appropriate times during the discussion.  For the most part, though, what I saw were students helping each other and confirming that they were all thinking along the same lines as they were working to complete the project. I really liked this project and I would definitely assign this again.  I was...
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Using Virtual Tools to Solve Real-World Problems

I recently saw this video come up in my Twitter Feed.  It is about a group of teenagers who are working on a project for Abbott Labs, and the story of their teacher who realizes that after working on this Real-World Problem, that the students will never be able to learn the same way ever again.  Meaning, in the traditional sense, without the technology and virtual tools.  I understand where the teacher is coming from.  But as an educator, I don't think it should take a project from Abbott Labs for us to realize this.  We need to realize this now.  We need to revolutionize learning for our students now.  We need to take action before its too late. ...
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Mid-Week Ideas, Anyone?

A couple of things I came across this week.  Of course, there were more, but here are the highlights:1.  TI-Nspire Videos over at Atomic Learning - These are wonderful walk-through videos which cover the basics, graphs and geometry, lists and spreadsheets, data and statistics, calculator and data collection. 2.  TopicMarks - I heard about this wonderful tool this week in my Twitter feed that summarizes text documents for you.  This has wide implications, such as allowing more free time to read other materials, or to just simply give an abstract for one of your own works.3.  Inequality Match Game - I actually found the direct link for this game from the North Carolina Public Schools first, and then hunted down the original source once I realized that the wonderful state of North Carolina has come up with what seems to be hundreds of activities for teaching math. ...
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Twitter Link Round-Up

Here's a recap of the links that I've posted on Twitter over the past week or so: 1.  A friend told me that she used this Divisibility Rocks game from over at The Utah Education Network with her Developmental Math students and that it worked really well.  It turns out that they have plenty of other great lesson plans as well. 2.  Z-Type is a very intense typing game.  It turns out that as a Math Instructor, I do have to teach typing, computer, and writing skills as well.  For example:  One student told me just today that he couldn't write a paper for my class about an African American Mathematician because he hadn't had an English class yet. 3.  NightMare is an example of a 25-word story.  I'm considering having my students write their own 25 word stories about a concept in mathematics.  This would be good introductory video to show to students, though, because it is absolutely hilarious!...
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Non-Apologetic Promotion of Twitter

Update:  50+ Twitter Links, including a Prezi about Twitter in Education. There have been at least 3 times in the last week when I have showed a colleague this website and have gotten a surprised look of, "Where did you get all of these ideas?"  When I tell people that Twitter feeds a majority of my inspiration to go looking for things, they start listening.  But no one ever really seems to follow through by actually signing up for Twitter.  From what I can tell, it is a slight fear of just not knowing enough.  So, here I'm sharing a few links and videos to help people get in the Twitter mood - Links: 10 Steps for New Educators to Twitter 50 Ideas on Using Twitter for Education 100 Free Tools to Make Your Teaching More Entertaining Videos: ...
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10 Potentially Helpful Resources

Here is the most recent set of helpful resources that I have sort of stumbled upon out of well over 200 hundred that I've looked at today: 1.  Broad Texter - This is a service that allows you to create a group so that your students can join so that they can receive text messages from you.  In fact, I've set up one for my students that I hope to use in the near future.  Feel free to sign up at the top of the page if you're so inclined. 2.  Smart Teaching Blog - My biggest advice when looking at this blog is to start scrolling down and to not get overwhelmed, as there are probably 1000s of resources listed, including this list of the 100 Best YouTube Videos for Teachers. 3.  Get the Math - This the link to 'Get the Math, an initiative out of the PBS Station in NYC, which has challenges related to fields such...
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Comment on a Few Useful Tools

This comment is more here for myself than for anyone else, as I keep on forgetting about them just because I don't have them documented anywhere: 1.  bit.ly - You would not believe (or maybe you would) how much this URL shortener has come in handy lately to quickly and easily customize URLs to give to my students.  At one point I customized something with the student's name because the student was afraid that he would forget by the time he got home.  You can't forget your name, now can you? 2.  zamzar.com - Free online file conversion.  I have found this especially useful to turn YouTube videos and the like into mp3 files and to simply download videos that would not normally be downloadable.  I know there are other websites out there that do this, but Zamzar keeps a record for you rather than just a one time conversion.  Nice. 3.  I think that the video below is...
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