Miscellaneous Links

After a recent afternoon meeting about statistics, I needed to find a few old links that I had buried away.  Well, here are a few odds and ends I found while looking: 1.  Virtual Math Lab at Texas A&M - This is a very good resource for College Algebra, Intermediate Algebra, and Beginning Algebra.  When I opened my link, it actually opened on 'Absolute Value Equations', which means that's probably what my students were struggling with when I initially discovered this website back in 2009. 2.  Quick-and-Dirty Guide to the TI-83, TI-83+, TI-84, and TI-84+ - Although it seems like it would…
Read More

Teaching the Unit Circle

This is simply another consequence of my poking around the web, and although I haven't taught trigonometry since last summer, I would consider using either of these ideas in the future: 1.  Touch Trigonometry - This is an interactive trigonometry graph and circle featuring the six basic trig functions.  I wasn't a fan at first because I'm colorblind, which made it seem like there was just too much going on, but I can see that it is a useful tool for those who are able to distinguish colors. 2.  Serving Unit-Circle Trigonometry on a Paper Plate - At first I thought…
Read More

Jeopardy! ‘Body Count’ Category.

For some reason I happened to see Jeopardy on 1/11/11 and I found the category 'Body Count' really intriguing.  When you read the clues, I think you'll find it intriguing as well: 400 - Chambers of the heart squared 800 - Usual number of ribs divided by 8 1200 - Pairs of chromosomes times 2 1600 - Permanent teeth divided by 2 and then multiplied by 10 2000 - Number of bones in the average adult human body plus 0. By the way, speaking of Jeopardy,  I found this FREE online "Make Your Own Jeopardy" Generator if you want to make…
Read More

The Central Limit Theorem

I know, I know... I haven't been posting a lot of statistics materials on here, but this is one actually turned out to be pretty sweet.  Here's how I did it:  On the top dotplot each student plotted their month of birth, along with the month of birth for three other people such as their mother, father, sibling, or closest friend.  Then on the bottom dotplot each student plotted the mean of each of the four numbers that they plotted on the top dotplot.  It turns out that this beautifully illustrates the Central Limit Theorem.  After I did this activity…
Read More

Using Post-It Notes in the Classroom

Honestly, I wasn't sure how college students would respond to writing their answer to a problem on a Post-It Note and then sticking it to the white board, but I thought that I would give it a whirl.  As it turned out, most of the students told me that they enjoyed the activity because it was unexpected, as I had given them a Post-It Note at the beginning of class and gave no instruction as to what to do with it until the end of class.  The students also told me that they enjoyed having to get up out of…
Read More

Maps and Mathematics

Just a couple of ideas that I think are interesting ways to approach the idea of using Maps to teach Mathematics.  I really think that the Map Application is a good away to introduce ordered pairs because students have to find locations such as A1, B2, etc., where there is a distinct order.  If you start getting students in the habit of thinking that the first coordinate is a letter and the second coordinate is a number, then it isn't as difficult to move to the first coordinate being the x-value and the second coordinate being the y-value.  And as…
Read More

Making Math Fun

I was having a discussion with someone today about making math more fun, and a few websites popped into my mind that I haven't shared on here before.  Let me give you a quick rundown of what I think are a few unique resources (all free, of course): Exploring Space Science Mathematics (http://image.gsfc.nasa.gov/poetry/MathDocs/spacemath.html) - This website is from NASA and has activities on topics such as time calculations, decimals, integers, mean, median, mode, equations, and scientific notation.  I regularly use the scientific notation activities in my classes as a way to wrap up a section on the topic.  If I…
Read More

Algebra Activities Binder

I don't know whether this post should go under the category of "promotion" or not, but what I do know is that I regularly use Maria Andersen's Algebra Activities Binder in my classroom.  We have been talking about solving equations in my basic mathematics class at IADT, and to finish out the chapter, today I used pages 3 through 6 from the chapter on equations.  The students really seemed to enjoy working in groups on the pages, but it probably was too much for them to do within 1 hour I allotted for them to do it in. But after…
Read More

Calculus Activity for Implicit Differentiation

Some of you may remember that I mentioned something about needing an activity for implicit differentiation when I went for a job interview a few weeks ago.  Well, here it is.  It really, really, really is meant to for the students to cut the pieces apart and then match them up rather than just draw lines to match on the page.  But do what you wish.  I have the WORD file if you would like to edit.  And please send me feedback if your students are using this!  Thanks. (more…)
Read More