A Real Life Optimization Problem

A Real Life Optimization Problem

I am part of a team at my college working on getting new storage closets installed for my department. The options are for closets that are 30", 36", or 42" wide. The closets are 18 ¾" deep, and 63 ½" in height. In one room, the space in which the closets are to be installed is 54 ¾" x 97 ½" x 96". In another room, the space is 54 ¾" x 114" x 96". However, in the second room, there is a whiteboard rail that is 3 ¼" wide that protrudes into the space. There are also plans to store 48" x 36" tri-fold poster boards in closets that are 24" x 36" when folded. There also needs to be enough clearance for the closet doors to open. At a meeting I attended the other day, I was asked, "How many 30", 36", and 42" closest should we order to maximize the amount of storage space, while taking into account the size...
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Museum of Illusions – Toronto, CA

Museum of Illusions – Toronto, CA

This post is the first of many about the mathematics I discovered while visiting museums and exhibits during my Fall 2019 sabbatical. The first one up is the Museum of Illusions - Toronto, Canada. This museum wasn’t originally part of my sabbatical plan as it just opened in October 2018. Although my favorite illusion was the rotated room, where it appears you are walking up the walls since the furniture is on the ceiling. I can see many applications of this exhibits in this museum in my own classes: Many exhibits with angles and perspective that could be integrated into a prealgebra class when teaching geometry Optical illusions and puzzles that could be used as ice breakers in any math class A Tower of Hanoi picture that could be used in a Discrete Math course And a special shoutout for having a great quote by Albert Einstein on the wall More information about some of the exhibits can also be found here. For more of my...
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