Logarithms and Related Rates

Logarithms and Related Rates

I was at the KYMATYC Conference over the weekend and was inspired by a Presentation on "Introducing Topics with Media." When I came home from the Conference, I created this page on Math in Film and Media. This was an excellent way for me to remember everything I learned during the session. It also helped me remember some things I've done in the past, which I'd forgotten. So, what does this have to do with Logarithms and Related Rates? Well, one of the Media Clips shared during the session was The Log Song – Ren & Stimpy. And this morning, a student emailed me saying, "That Chapter with logs was extremely challenging for me. Other than that, I think I will do fine." Since I knew he was going to Chicago for a work trip right before the final exam, I sent him this email: If you need a few short videos for your plane ride to Chicago, try these: Logarithms: Properties of Logarithms – Part...
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I Cleaned Out My Office!

I Cleaned Out My Office!

I’ve been cleaning out my office the past couple of months, and this week I came across these resources that may be of use to someone out there - especially teaching statistics, pre-calculus, or calculus! Article - “Why You Should Read That Whole Text Book Right Now” "Don't put it off. You should read that textbook now—or you're not getting your money's worth out of your education." StatisticsArticle - “Overconfident Students, Dubious Employers”Link to Article | Probability Activity“A new study identifies the gaps between graduates' views of their skills and the views of those who hire them.”Article - “Investing In A World Of Unknown Future Outcomes: The Benefits Of Equal Weighting”Link to Article | Probability ActivityHeads and Tails DataData used to find the probability of at least three heads in five tosses of a fair coin by simulation.Learning Styles DataData from two groups (Class A and Class B) on their learning styles (Visual, Auditory, Tactile)Binomial Probabilities HandoutWhen to use the Probability Density Function...
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A Real Life Optimization Problem

A Real Life Optimization Problem

I am part of a team at my college working on getting new storage closets installed for my department. The options are for closets that are 30", 36", or 42" wide. The closets are 18 ¾" deep, and 63 ½" in height. In one room, the space in which the closets are to be installed is 54 ¾" x 97 ½" x 96". In another room, the space is 54 ¾" x 114" x 96". However, in the second room, there is a whiteboard rail that is 3 ¼" wide that protrudes into the space. There are also plans to store 48" x 36" tri-fold poster boards in closets that are 24" x 36" when folded. There also needs to be enough clearance for the closet doors to open. At a meeting I attended the other day, I was asked, "How many 30", 36", and 42" closest should we order to maximize the amount of storage space, while taking into account the size...
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Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) Workshops – Torrance, CA

Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) Workshops – Torrance, CA

I am glad that I attended this workshop by the Academy of Inquiry-Based Learning because it gave me lots of new ideas for my College Algebra course. It also helped to excite and re-energize, as well as renew my love for teaching. It was helpful to be around like-minded people and know that I am on the right track in doing what is best for my students. Here are some ideas from the workshop that I either have already implemented or plan to implement: Write four problems on the Board and then have students sign-up to present solutions. The student who signs up for the least number of problems gets to do it. If they make a mistake while at the Board, they get one pass before someone else gets to try it. Consider a minimum number of presentations per student each semester. Students need a chance to reflect on what they’ve just read, learned, viewed, discussed, etc. Each group needs to have...
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Real Life Pythagorean Theorem

So, I’d like to believe that most people know the Pythagorean Theorem. The famous a2 + b2 = c2 theorem that relates the lengths of the sides of a right triangle. Earlier this month, I was helping my mom move. The moving company requested to know the size of my mom’s televisions. Since my mom has a 1990s console-style Cathode-ray tube (CRT) television, I was going to measure the length, width, depth, and screen size so that the company would have an accurate idea of the size of the television as possible. If you didn’t know, the screen size of a TV is always measured diagonally, which is a practice that was started by early TV manufacturers simply to make the size of the TV more impressive. Mathematically, the diagonal of a TV will always be longer than its length or width. Another thing to note is that for old CRT TVs like my mom’s, the size of the TV’s diagonal measurement is...
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Thoughts on Today’s Educational System

The other day I was talking with a friend who isn’t a teacher and our conversation led me to have the following thoughts: What we do in what has become today’s traditional educational system where students are expected to sit in rows and attend classes all day and then go home to do homework doesn’t work for most students. It is unnatural for someone to sit for that long at a time, let alone a younger person. In general, people do tend to learn better by being actively involved in their learning. I reminded my friend that the educational system hasn’t always been this way. Anyway, here is what I think has happened: At some point, America primarily was a land of farms. Children would wake up early to help their family on the farm, learning valuable life lessons along the way as well. Then, later in the day, the children would go to a one-room schoolhouse for a lesson on reading and...
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Distribution of my Facebook Friends’ Names

The other day I was talking with my friend Matt, and he said to me that he thought I knew a lot of people with names starting with “J.” I thought that was a bit strange, but started looking through my Facebook Friends list out of curiosity, and sure enough, Matt was right. The distribution of my Facebook Friends’ Names is below: Then he claimed that he felt that most of my friend’s names began with a “J.” As you can see, the highest is “J” with 43, followed by “S – 35,” “M – 32,” “D – 31,” and “R – 30.” And if your name starts with a “U” or an “X,” I’m likely not to be your friend. So, I wanted to test Matt’s hypothesis that most of my friend’s names start with a “J.” H0: the proportion of my friend’s names that start with a “J” is 0.5 H1: the proportion of my friend’s names that start with a “J”...
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